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Jacob Grox

To the person(s) making multi accounts...

36 posts in this topic

And threatening to DDOS a server outside of your nation, hack certain individuals in this community, constantly harassing the moderation team and your fellow users, breaking rules, causing chaos, abusing the game's systems: You've gone too far.

This is no longer a matter of you being perma-banned, that's been settled. Your recent actions however are not only breaking the game's rules, but they are also illegal, and we will be forced to take legal action if you do not cease all activities on this forum right now. We've had enough, and if you're polite enough you will not be getting any really, really bad repercussions in real life

This is your last chance.

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1 minute ago, Jacob Grox said:

And threatening to DDOS a server outside of your nation, hack certain individuals in this community, constantly harassing the moderation team and your fellow users, breaking rules, causing chaos, abusing the game's systems: You've gone too far.

This is no longer a matter of you being perma-banned, that's been settled. Your recent actions however are not only breaking the game's rules, but they are also illegal, and we will be forced to take legal action if you do not cease all activities on this forum right now. We've had enough, and if you're polite enough you will not be getting any really, really bad repercussions in real life

This is your last chance.

Look man I am not the hacker here :)

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Just now, Der Mannjäger. said:

Look man I am not the hacker here :)

You've made threats. Serious threats. There's proof of you doing so. If you don't cease right now, you can really expect some bad shit happening.

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Just now, Jacob Grox said:

You've made threats. Serious threats. There's proof of you doing so. If you don't cease right now, you can really expect some bad shit happening.

sooooooooooooooooooo you are saying you want me to get in more trouble in the law then I am right now cause I am in trouble I dont need anymore .-.

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Just now, Der Mannjäger. said:

sooooooooooooooooooo you are saying you want me to get in more trouble in the law then I am right now cause I am in trouble I dont need anymore .-.

Never claimed I wanted anyone in trouble. It's just that you're a troublesome enough individual to actually deserve it. I would not make a claim this serious baselessly.

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Considering he is the one coming to Stian'a game and starting all this legal drama... since April I may add... seriously...

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I hate these posts... why can't a person simply enjoy the game without attempting to destroy it for others

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1 minute ago, zultron said:

I hate these posts... why can't a person simply enjoy the game without attempting to destroy it for others

I'm hoping words war when they're at war, but I found words war of something stupid abuse.

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ONLINE SCAM BY THIS GAME A CRIME OF CYBER BULLYING AND SCAMS 

 

Anyone who has spent time on the Internet knows that things online aren’t always as they seem. The general anonymity of the Internet has provided fertile ground for new forms of fraud. In this section, you’ll find information on common online scams and steps to take if you’ve been the victim of one.

Common Types of Online Scams

Online scams can take many forms. Here are just a few of the most common types of online fraud:

Phishing

In a phishing scheme, the scammer attempts to obtain private information from a victim by posing as a reputable entity in an email or other electronic communication. For example, the scammer may send you an email posing as a bank representative and claiming that your account requires verification. The email would then direct you to a fake banking site where you would be asked to provide sensitive information like your account number, username, password, and more. With the information, the scammer would then have access to your account.

Work at Home

You’ve probably seen ads online for jobs that seem too good to be true. Unfortunately, most of them are. Many work-at-home schemes require you to purchase expensive materials or pay upfront fees without providing you with the means to earn a living. Others are Ponzi schemes, requiring you to recruit others in exchange for a cut of the fees.

Fake Apartment Rentals

Like work-at-home opportunities, rental ads are sometimes too good to be true. In a rental scam, the perpetrator places an ad on Craigslist or another classifieds site advertising a rental unit for a good price. The photos and other information are often stolen from legitimate listings. When potential renters show interest, the scammer claims to be out of town and asks them to wire first-month’s rent or other fees to an out-of-state location.

“Catfish” Scams

A “catfish” is someone who creates a fake social media account in order to pursue an online romance. Sometimes, catfish convince their victims to send money or gifts, or to pay for their travel or other expenses.

Unexpected Prizes

The Internet is littered with pop-up ads telling you that you’ve won an iPod or qualified for a free vacation. Are they telling the truth? Probably not. These “contests” often require you to pay certain fees or shipping costs in order to receive your “prize.” Of course, most of the time there is no prize and the perpetrators pocket the fees.

If You’ve Been the Victim of an Online Scam

If you think you’ve been the victim of an online scam, the first thing you should do is ask for a refund. If that fails, you can file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) or your local consumer protection office. The FTC investigates and prosecutes cases involving a wide range of online fraud, including identity theft, fake sweepstakes, credit scams, and more.

The perpetrators of online scams are often charged with federal wire fraud crimes. Wire fraud is similar to regular fraud, except that it involves the use of interstate electronic communications, including email, instant messages, or other online activity. If the perpetrators of an online scam are convicted, they may be ordered to pay restitution to their victims. Restitution is a payment that’s intended to financially restore victims of a crime to the point they were at prior to the commission of the crime.

In recent years, federal and state legislators have taken additional steps to help prevent online scams. In 2003, Congress passed the Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing (CAN-SPAM) Act in order to combat “spam” email. In 2005, the Anti-Phishing Act was introduced in Congress, proposing a five-year prison sentence for those convicted of phishing. While the Act was never passed into federal law, California, Texas, and a number of other states have adopted the anti-phishing law.

Free Case Review by a Criminal Law Attorney

Online scams seem to be the wave of the future. Hackers, identity theft masters, phishing attempts, and internet scammers have barraged our computers with endless ways to mistakenly become crime victims. If you've been the victim of any of these scams, you need to understand your rights and remedies for restitution and protection. Your best move is to get a free case evaluation from an expert criminal law attorney as soon as possible.

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Abuse of power, in the form of "malfeasance in office" or "official misconduct," is the commission of an unlawful act, done in an official capacity, which affects the performance of official duties. Malfeasance in office is often grounds for a for cause removal of an elected official by statute or recall election. Abuse of power can also mean a person using the power they have for their own personal gain.

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IT IS ALSO AGAINST THE LAW TO FALSELY CLAIM AND TAKE SOMEONE TO COURT FOR A FALSE CLAIM 

 

(a)Liability for Certain Acts.—
(1)In general.—Subject to paragraph (2), any person who—
(A)
knowingly presents, or causes to be presented, a false or fraudulent claim for payment or approval;
(B)
knowingly makes, uses, or causes to be made or used, a false record or statement material to a false or fraudulent claim;
(C)
conspires to commit a violation of subparagraph (A), (B), (D), (E), (F), or (G);
(D)
has possession, custody, or control of property or money used, or to be used, by the Government and knowingly delivers, or causes to be delivered, less than all of that money or property;
(E)
is authorized to make or deliver a document certifying receipt of property used, or to be used, by the Government and, intending to defraud the Government, makes or delivers the receipt without completely knowing that the information on the receipt is true;
(F)
knowingly buys, or receives as a pledge of an obligation or debt, public property from an officer or employee of the Government, or a member of the Armed Forces, who lawfully may not sell or pledge property; or
(G)
knowingly makes, uses, or causes to be made or used, a false record or statement material to an obligation to pay or transmit money or property to the Government, or knowingly conceals or knowingly and improperly avoids or decreases an obligation to pay or transmit money or property to the Government,
is liable to the United States Government for a civil penalty of not less than $5,000 and not more than $10,000, as adjusted by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 (28 U.S.C. 2461 note; Public Law 104–410[1]), plus 3 times the amount of damages which the Government sustains because of the act of that person.
(2)Reduced damages.—If the court finds that—
(A)
the person committing the violation of this subsection furnished officials of the United States responsible for investigating false claims violations with all information known to such person about the violation within 30 days after the date on which the defendant first obtained the information;
(B)
such person fully cooperated with any Government investigation of such violation; and
(C)
at the time such person furnished the United States with the information about the violation, no criminal prosecution, civil action, or administrative action had commenced under this title with respect to such violation, and the person did not have actual knowledge of the existence of an investigation into such violation,
the court may assess not less than 2 times the amount of damages which the Government sustains because of the act of that person.
(3)Costs of civil actions.—
A person violating this subsection shall also be liable to the United States Government for the costs of a civil action brought to recover any such penalty or damages.
(b)Definitions.—For purposes of this section—
(1)the terms “knowing” and “knowingly”—
(A)mean that a person, with respect to information—
(i)
has actual knowledge of the information;
(ii)
acts in deliberate ignorance of the truth or falsity of the information; or
(iii)
acts in reckless disregard of the truth or falsity of the information; and
(B)
require no proof of specific intent to defraud;
(2)the term “claim”—
(A)means any request or demand, whether under a contract or otherwise, for money or property and whether or not the United States has title to the money or property, that—
(i)
is presented to an officer, employee, or agent of the United States; or
(ii)is made to a contractor, grantee, or other recipient, if the money or property is to be spent or used on the Government’s behalf or to advance a Government program or interest, and if the United States Government—
(I)
provides or has provided any portion of the money or property requested or demanded; or
(II)
will reimburse such contractor, grantee, or other recipient for any portion of the money or property which is requested or demanded; and
(B)
does not include requests or demands for money or property that the Government has paid to an individual as compensation for Federal employment or as an income subsidy with no restrictions on that individual’s use of the money or property;
(3)
the term “obligation” means an established duty, whether or not fixed, arising from an express or implied contractual, grantor-grantee, or licensor-licensee relationship, from a fee-based or similar relationship, from statute or regulation, or from the retention of any overpayment; and
(4)
the term “material” means having a natural tendency to influence, or be capable of influencing, the payment or receipt of money or property.
(c)Exemption From Disclosure.—
Any information furnished pursuant to subsection (a)(2) shall be exempt from disclosure under section 552 of title 5.
(d)Exclusion.—
This section does not apply to claims, records, or statements made under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
(Pub. L. 97–258, Sept. 13, 1982, 96 Stat. 978; Pub. L. 99–562, § 2, Oct. 27, 1986, 100 Stat. 3153; Pub. L. 103–272, § 4(f)(1)(O), July 5, 1994, 108 Stat. 1362; Pub. L. 111–21, § 4(a), May 20, 2009, 123 Stat. 1621.)

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This is too good. I won't delete these just so we can use it against them like every post they continue to make. 

For the record, you don't have your sources, and again, this game is hosted in Norway meaning that any threat of a DDoS is an international crime. 

Bolding the below so it can be read easier. 

15 minutes ago, Black Hat said:

ONLINE SCAM BY THIS GAME A CRIME OF CYBER BULLYING AND SCAMS 

 

Anyone who has spent time on the Internet knows that things online aren’t always as they seem. The general anonymity of the Internet has provided fertile ground for new forms of fraud. In this section, you’ll find information on common online scams and steps to take if you’ve been the victim of one.

Common Types of Online Scams

Online scams can take many forms. Here are just a few of the most common types of online fraud:

Phishing

In a phishing scheme, the scammer attempts to obtain private information from a victim by posing as a reputable entity in an email or other electronic communication. For example, the scammer may send you an email posing as a bank representative and claiming that your account requires verification. The email would then direct you to a fake banking site where you would be asked to provide sensitive information like your account number, username, password, and more. With the information, the scammer would then have access to your account.

Work at Home

You’ve probably seen ads online for jobs that seem too good to be true. Unfortunately, most of them are. Many work-at-home schemes require you to purchase expensive materials or pay upfront fees without providing you with the means to earn a living. Others are Ponzi schemes, requiring you to recruit others in exchange for a cut of the fees.

Fake Apartment Rentals

Like work-at-home opportunities, rental ads are sometimes too good to be true. In a rental scam, the perpetrator places an ad on Craigslist or another classifieds site advertising a rental unit for a good price. The photos and other information are often stolen from legitimate listings. When potential renters show interest, the scammer claims to be out of town and asks them to wire first-month’s rent or other fees to an out-of-state location.

“Catfish” Scams

A “catfish” is someone who creates a fake social media account in order to pursue an online romance. Sometimes, catfish convince their victims to send money or gifts, or to pay for their travel or other expenses.

Unexpected Prizes

The Internet is littered with pop-up ads telling you that you’ve won an iPod or qualified for a free vacation. Are they telling the truth? Probably not. These “contests” often require you to pay certain fees or shipping costs in order to receive your “prize.” Of course, most of the time there is no prize and the perpetrators pocket the fees.

If You’ve Been the Victim of an Online Scam

If you think you’ve been the victim of an online scam, the first thing you should do is ask for a refund. If that fails, you can file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) or your local consumer protection office. The FTC investigates and prosecutes cases involving a wide range of online fraud, including identity theft, fake sweepstakes, credit scams, and more.

The perpetrators of online scams are often charged with federal wire fraud crimes. Wire fraud is similar to regular fraud, except that it involves the use of interstate electronic communications, including email, instant messages, or other online activity. If the perpetrators of an online scam are convicted, they may be ordered to pay restitution to their victims. Restitution is a payment that’s intended to financially restore victims of a crime to the point they were at prior to the commission of the crime.

In recent years, federal and state legislators have taken additional steps to help prevent online scams. In 2003, Congress passed the Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing (CAN-SPAM) Act in order to combat “spam” email. In 2005, the Anti-Phishing Act was introduced in Congress, proposing a five-year prison sentence for those convicted of phishing. While the Act was never passed into federal law, California, Texas, and a number of other states have adopted the anti-phishing law.

Free Case Review by a Criminal Law Attorney

Online scams seem to be the wave of the future. Hackers, identity theft masters, phishing attempts, and internet scammers have barraged our computers with endless ways to mistakenly become crime victims. If you've been the victim of any of these scams, you need to understand your rights and remedies for restitution and protection. Your best move is to get a free case evaluation from an expert criminal law attorney as soon as possible.

Your basic points are saying that we present an offer.

Simply put, we don't, you come to us by making multiple accounts on NationsGame, further cementing that fact.

14 minutes ago, Black Hat said:

Abuse of power, in the form of "malfeasance in office" or "official misconduct," is the commission of an unlawful act, done in an official capacity, which affects the performance of official duties. Malfeasance in office is often grounds for a for cause removal of an elected official by statute or recall election. Abuse of power can also mean a person using the power they have for their own personal gain.

It looks like you just quoted something out of a government handbook? Needless to say this game is nothing related to actual government.

13 minutes ago, Black Hat said:

IT IS ALSO AGAINST THE LAW TO FALSELY CLAIM AND TAKE SOMEONE TO COURT FOR A FALSE CLAIM 

 

(a)Liability for Certain Acts.—
(1)In general.—Subject to paragraph (2), any person who—
(A)
knowingly presents, or causes to be presented, a false or fraudulent claim for payment or approval;
(B)
knowingly makes, uses, or causes to be made or used, a false record or statement material to a false or fraudulent claim;
(C)
conspires to commit a violation of subparagraph (A), (B), (D), (E), (F), or (G);
(D)
has possession, custody, or control of property or money used, or to be used, by the Government and knowingly delivers, or causes to be delivered, less than all of that money or property;
(E)
is authorized to make or deliver a document certifying receipt of property used, or to be used, by the Government and, intending to defraud the Government, makes or delivers the receipt without completely knowing that the information on the receipt is true;
(F)
knowingly buys, or receives as a pledge of an obligation or debt, public property from an officer or employee of the Government, or a member of the Armed Forces, who lawfully may not sell or pledge property; or
(G)
knowingly makes, uses, or causes to be made or used, a false record or statement material to an obligation to pay or transmit money or property to the Government, or knowingly conceals or knowingly and improperly avoids or decreases an obligation to pay or transmit money or property to the Government,
is liable to the United States Government for a civil penalty of not less than $5,000 and not more than $10,000, as adjusted by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 (28 U.S.C. 2461 note; Public Law 104–410[1]), plus 3 times the amount of damages which the Government sustains because of the act of that person.
(2)Reduced damages.—If the court finds that—
(A)
the person committing the violation of this subsection furnished officials of the United States responsible for investigating false claims violations with all information known to such person about the violation within 30 days after the date on which the defendant first obtained the information;
(B)
such person fully cooperated with any Government investigation of such violation; and
(C)
at the time such person furnished the United States with the information about the violation, no criminal prosecution, civil action, or administrative action had commenced under this title with respect to such violation, and the person did not have actual knowledge of the existence of an investigation into such violation,
the court may assess not less than 2 times the amount of damages which the Government sustains because of the act of that person.
(3)Costs of civil actions.—
A person violating this subsection shall also be liable to the United States Government for the costs of a civil action brought to recover any such penalty or damages.
(b)Definitions.—For purposes of this section—
(1)the terms “knowing” and “knowingly”—
(A)mean that a person, with respect to information—
(i)
has actual knowledge of the information;
(ii)
acts in deliberate ignorance of the truth or falsity of the information; or
(iii)
acts in reckless disregard of the truth or falsity of the information; and
(B)
require no proof of specific intent to defraud;
(2)the term “claim”—
(A)means any request or demand, whether under a contract or otherwise, for money or property and whether or not the United States has title to the money or property, that—
(i)
is presented to an officer, employee, or agent of the United States; or
(ii)is made to a contractor, grantee, or other recipient, if the money or property is to be spent or used on the Government’s behalf or to advance a Government program or interest, and if the United States Government—
(I)
provides or has provided any portion of the money or property requested or demanded; or
(II)
will reimburse such contractor, grantee, or other recipient for any portion of the money or property which is requested or demanded; and
(B)
does not include requests or demands for money or property that the Government has paid to an individual as compensation for Federal employment or as an income subsidy with no restrictions on that individual’s use of the money or property;
(3)
the term “obligation” means an established duty, whether or not fixed, arising from an express or implied contractual, grantor-grantee, or licensor-licensee relationship, from a fee-based or similar relationship, from statute or regulation, or from the retention of any overpayment; and
(4)
the term “material” means having a natural tendency to influence, or be capable of influencing, the payment or receipt of money or property.
(c)Exemption From Disclosure.—
Any information furnished pursuant to subsection (a)(2) shall be exempt from disclosure under section 552 of title 5.
(d)Exclusion.—
This section does not apply to claims, records, or statements made under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
(Pub. L. 97–258, Sept. 13, 1982, 96 Stat. 978; Pub. L. 99–562, § 2, Oct. 27, 1986, 100 Stat. 3153; Pub. L. 103–272, § 4(f)(1)(O), July 5, 1994, 108 Stat. 1362; Pub. L. 111–21, § 4(a), May 20, 2009, 123 Stat. 1621.)

We're not taking you to court, we don't have to. We have multiple accounts of evidence that you have guiltily presented showing that you intend to DDoS this server station. Which, prompt you, since you're from the United States, is a federal crime of terrorism, even just to threaten that so that's an instant report to the FBI by standard US law; secondly, you're threatening a server station in Norway, prompting this as an international cyberattack threat. 

So... why make things worse than you already made them by quoting material without sources, and that doesn't pertain to how serious your situation is?

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Please note, the moderation team has been very sincere about this issue considering the first time you threatened a DDoS was April 2016 and only when you continually did so did we actually make a report.

Don't get us wrong, we are submitting it this time.

Even though you aren't an American adult, children who commit to threats of terrorism are still convicted as adults under US law. So don't make this worse than it already is by making more accounts and continuing to spew filth inside our community.

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Stian and I have already discuss this matter he has given me a chance but you are in my way before you were mod you would always go running to Stian and cry HAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHA COLLEGE LESBIAN FEMINIST HEAD ASS BITCH!!

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